Have you been living on the wrong side of the law and didn’t know it? Check out this collection of obscure Kentucky laws to find out.

Many of us know not to carry an ice-cream cone in our pockets when in Lexington or Louisville, but there are many other obscure statutes still on the books in Kentucky that can trip up us.
 
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The Rabbit Hash General Store, long the center of social life in a small Kentucky river town, is on track to reopen this spring after a devastating fire.

The Rabbit Hash General Store, a fixture in the small Northern Kentucky hamlet of Rabbit Hash since 1831, was gutted by fire on February 13, 2016. Don Clare, president of the Rabbit Hash Historical Society since 1979, shares his thoughts on why preservation of our historic places is important, and his appreciation for the many individuals and businesses who rallied together to help rebuild.
 
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There were challenges, sure, but there was also plenty to celebrate in 2016, especially in the Bluegrass state. Here’s a look back at the events and people who helped Kentucky kick ass this year.

It’s that time again, y’all. Time to count our blessings and take stock of all the awesome things that happened this year while looking towards the new. Across Kentucky there were plenty of people and events that made a positive impact and helped make the Bluegrass state shine a little brighter. We’ve no doubt left a lot of notable Kentucky kick-assery off of the list, so shoot us a message at info@kyforky.com and let us know the positive contributions you’d add!
 
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These timeless traditions speak to a simpler holiday celebration focused on family and friends.

Different parts of Kentucky observe different holiday traditions, but the Appalachian regions hold some of the most timeless. For example, did you know that many people living in Appalachian and Amish communities celebrate Christmas twice? The initial Christmas is the same is it is now, December 25, while the second, called Old Christmas, is celebrated on January 6 at the end of the traditional 12 days of Christmas.

 

Many of these Christmas traditions have fallen by the wayside (celebratory cannon fire anyone?), but some are still observed today. Here’s a look.
 
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