Help Rebuild Rabbit Hash General Store

by Kentucky For Kentucky |

Fire destroyed Boone County’s iconic Rabbit Hash General Store last weekend. Here’s how you can help.

Photo by Michael Garrity
Mudslides, numerous floods, the Civil War, the Great Depression, generations of rambunctious Kentucky kids—it seemed that the iconic Rabbit Hash General Store in Boone County was built to withstand anything man or nature could throw its way.

 

That’s why we were especially heartsick to awaken on Sunday morning to the news that a devastating fire had destroyed the historic building. The Rabbit Hash General Store has been in continuous operation since 1831.

 

Although the structure was deemed a “total loss,” we know that when resourceful, resilient Kentuckians are involved there’s no counting anything out.

 

Firefighters were able to save the store’s well-known sign, which promises “Tobacco, Sundries, Potions and Notions” and is being stored in a nearby barn. The owners, who lease the building from the Rabbit Hash Historical Society, plan to rebuild and a GoFundMe page has already been launched.

 

As of Friday morning, more than 950 people had already helped raise nearly $51,000 towards the fund’s $250,000 goal.

 

Even the town’s name was born of resiliency and resourcefulness. According to the General Store’s website, the name “Rabbit Hash” is said to have originated during the flood of 1847, when the local rabbit population was driven to higher ground, where many became the main ingredient in a “hash” stew.

 

Most of the town, which sits on the banks of the Ohio River, was wiped out by a particularly devastating flood in 1937. Although the General Store was completely submerged (the website reports that you could still find traces of river mud in the attic), the building survived thanks to iron rods that supported and anchored the building.

 

And, with continued support from folks like you and our fellow kick-ass Kentuckians, it will survive again. Please consider sharing your Rabbit Hash General Store story and donating what you can here.

Happy Birthday was invented by the Hill sisters in Louisville, Kentucky.

Kentucky for Kentucky